Machine to Machine Solutions Featured Article

Avery Dennison Expands Contract with Marks & Spencer


January 23, 2013

By Raju Shanbhag, TMCnet Contributor


With costs of deploying RFID technology decreasing, more and more companies are showing interest in deploying this technology. That is mainly because RFID technology can help and reduce warehouse and distribution costs and improve forecasting and planning.


Looking to increase the availability of its products in stores, Marks & Spencer PLC has expanded its RFID supply contract with Avery Dennison. Marks & Spencer has been making use of the technology services by Avery Dennison for nine years now.

Avery Dennison’s RFID technology will now be used by Marks & Spencer in its clothing and home ware products. The procedure of deploying RFID technology in these products will begin by 2013 and is expected to be completed by 2014.

RFID technology allows items to be scanned faster than a typical barcode. Barcode technology allows about 400-600 items to be scanned every hour, with RFID technology a company can scan about 15,000 items per hour. This means the company can get its products to the stores quicker and react to an immediate surge in demands more efficient than ever before.

 Avery Dennison’s RFID makes use of Ultra high frequency (UHF) inlays in its products. Various products which need to be tracked can also make use of this technology. 

“We are pleased to have partnered with M&S over the last 9 years as an industry leader in the activation of RFID by proving out their business case and delivering on the operational efficiencies promised by the technology,” said Shawn Neville, president, retail branding and information solutions, Avery Dennison, “As one of the UK’s biggest retailers, M&S is focused on providing exceptional customer experience and RFID enables that experience by ensuring inventory accuracy from the distribution center to the store floor.”

Recently, the company announced that it partnered with WGSN to create specific trend reports.




Edited by Carlos Olivera

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